Sexual violence can happen between people of the same and/or different genders. CMSAC is committed to providing services that honors all gender identities and sexual orientations within our diverse communities.  Toward that end, CMSAC Staff have participated in Safe Space training to educate themselves regarding obstacles faced by LGBTQ+ individuals every day, as well as to learn better techniques for creating safer spaces wherein everyone feels respected and comfortable.  Sexual assault is never the victim’s fault, and no one ever deserves to be sexually assaulted. Your gender identity and/or sexual orientation never justify sexual violence against you.

If you are a loved one of an LGBTQ+ survivor of sexual assault, it is important to remember that the survivor may be experiencing many different emotions. Following an assault, remind your loved one that you are there for them and are willing to support them. Everyone’s healing journey is different, and we must support each individual unconditionally.

Medical Attention

If you are a member of the LGBTQ+ community, you may be nervous in seeking medical attention for a sexual assault. However, health care is often the first step to healing for many survivors. If you are interested in seeking medical attention, you deserve to be treated with respect and dignity. You may reference local hospitals and other medical resources here: https://cmsac.org/education-safety-reporting/

Resources

 gender-unicorn-photo-lgbtq-tab

The Gender Unicorn is a useful tool for understanding gender identity and sexual orientation. Different areas on the Gender Unicorn represent where individuals fall on spectrums that shape our gender and sexual identity. Refer to the following web site for examples to help you complete your own Gender Unicorn: http://www.transstudent.org/genderunicornexample.jpeg.

The Gender Unicorn explained:

Gender identity is defined as: one’s internal sense of being masculine, feminine, neither of these, both, or another gender(s). Everyone has a gender identity. For transgender people, the sex assigned at birth and one’s internal sense of gender identity are not the same. Female, woman, and girl and male, man, and boy are NOT necessarily linked to each other; but are just six common gender identities.

Gender expression/presentation is defined as: the physical manifestation of one’s gender identity through clothing, hairstyle, voice, body shape, etc. Most transgender people seek to make their gender expression (how they look) match their gender identity (who they are), rather than their sex assigned at birth.

Sex assigned at birth is defined as: the assignment and classification of people as male, female, intersex, or another sex based on a combination of anatomy, hormones, and chromosomes. Chromosomes are frequently used to determine sex from prenatal karyotyping (although not as commonly used as genitalia). Chromosomes do not determine genitalia.

Sexually attracted to is also known as sexual orientation. It is important to note that sexual and romantic/emotional attraction can result from a variety of factors including (but not limited to) gender identity, gender expression/presentation, and sex assigned at birth.

Romantically/emotionally attracted to refers to one’s romantic/emotional orientation. It is important to note that sexual and romantic/emotional attraction can result from a variety of factors including (but not limited to) gender identity, gender expression/presentation, and sex assigned at birth.

Source: The Gender Unicorn. Retrieved December 7th, 2016, from transstudent.org/gender

For more information regarding terms and vocabulary relating to the LGBTQ+ community: http://itspronouncedmetrosexual.com/2013/01/a-comprehensive-list-of-lgbtq-term-definitions/#sthash.DoG7TvcC.dpbs

Source:

Comprehensive List of LGBTQ Vocabulary Definitions. (n.d.). Retrieved December 8, 2016, from http://itspronouncedmetrosexual.com/2013/01/a-comprehensive-list-of-lgbtq-term-definitions/#sthash.DoG7TvcC.dpbs